Image of the Week - February 5, 2018 - CIL:50201 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/50201

Image of the Week - February 5, 2018 - CIL:50201 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/50201
2 rating(s) (5 ø)

CIL:50201 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/50201

Description: A longstanding limitation of imaging with serial block-face scanning electron microscopy is specimen surface charging. This charging is largely due to the difficulties in making biological specimens and the resins in which they are embedded sufficiently conductive. Local accumulation of charge on the specimen surface can result in poor image quality and distortions. Even minor charging can lead to misalignments between sequential images of the block-face due to image jitter. Typically, variable-pressure SEM is used to reduce specimen charging, but this results in a significant reduction to spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and overall image quality. Here we show the development and application of a simple system that effectively mitigates specimen charging by using focal gas injection of nitrogen over the sample block-face during imaging. A standard gas injection valve is paired with a precisely positioned but retractable application nozzle, which is mechanically coupled to the reciprocating action of the serial block-face ultramicrotome. This system enables the application of nitrogen gas precisely over the block-face during imaging while allowing the specimen chamber to be maintained under high vacuum to maximise achievable SEM image resolution. The action of the ultramicrotome drives the nozzle retraction, automatically moving it away from the specimen area during the cutting cycle of the knife. The device described was added to a Gatan 3View system with minimal modifications, allowing high-resolution block-face imaging of even the most charge prone of epoxy-embedded biological samples.

Authors: Tom Deerinck, Tristan Shone, Eric Bushong, Ranjan Ramachandra, Steven Peltier, and Mark Ellisman

Licensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

Public Domain Dedication

You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.
 - Uploaded 17 days ago
383 Views
The maximum length of a comment is 1000 characters.
The maximum length of an alias is 30 characters.
Please enter a comment.
Please insert a valid comment!